Equality and Discrimination


Anyone who has followed this blog for any length of time will know that a hobby horse of mine is the insufficient recognition of the contribution made to our society by women. I know that I’m a couple of days late but Sunday was International Women’s Day so I wanted to feature some specific women and, what is more, women entrepreneurs. So, I’ve chosen two such women, and their two female colleagues, who have recently launched a venture which could be very good for the village in which I live, although they do not live here, and in which I have become involved in a small way.

The team which has brought a new community magazine to my Wharfedale village, Menston.  L to R, Louise Atkinson, partner and graphic designer, Cathy Frobisher , Office Manager, Janet-Alison  Arkright , Partner and 'Sales Contributor', and   Andrea Kerman, Sales Person, at the reception in their offices in Haworth, each holding the first edition of the new magazine.

The all-female team which has brought a new community magazine to my Wharfedale village, Menston. Left to Right: Louise Atkinson, Partner and Graphic Designer; Cathy Frobisher, Office Manager; Janet-Alison Arkright , Partner and ‘Sales Contributor'; and Andrea Kerman, Sales Person. Proudly showing the first edition of the magazine open at the Menston pages.

From the village in which lived three extraordinary women who through their writings put the Yorkshire village of Haworth and Yorkshire on the world map – the Bronte sisters of course – this quartet – all mothers with young children, continue what Charlotte, Emily and Anne began.

Menston section of the new community magazine 'It's the business', covering postcode area LS29

Menston section of the new community magazine ‘It’s the business’, covering postcode area LS29 in Wharfedale, Yorkshire

My small contribution to the venture is to write the Menston page and compile the list of events and activities in Menston village. This fits in very well with doing the same thing for what I call the ‘alternative’ Menston website:
http://menstonvillagewharfedale.com

My village’s community activities thrive on the efforts of a lot of remarkable women who live in Menston; many of them are volunteers for a wide range of community organisations ranging from offering support to the elderly to a female choir or arranging events to raise money for victims of the Philippines typhoon Haiyan; several are entepreneurs who run their own businesses, ranging from the village bakery to a fitness studio offering Pilates sessions.

Going back to the female team behind the new magazine, all are mothers and the two partners also run other businesses as well as caring for the family:

Janet-Alison Arkwright has three young sons and a collection of rescue dogs and cats at home. Now qualified in Business, Finance and Law, Janet started as a cleaner at Airedale Hospital but eventually became Cancer Information Officer. She subsequently worked for top names like Asda, worked part-time on the business side for another local magazine and set up her own cleaning company, JA Services Ltd, which she still runs in Haworth. She manages to find the time too for competitive fell running as a member of Keighley and Craven Athletics Club.

Louise Atkinson has a son at primary school. She has a B Tech in graphic design and worked for several years in the print industry covering every aspect. Almost seven years ago she set up her own print company and runs that, KTG Design and Print, and offers graphic design services from Stanbury, close to Haworth. 

Andrea Kerman began work with Magnet, a well-known local kitchen manufacturer, then after a period with a knitting yarns supplier spent several years with the Inland Revenue. She is also a competitive fell runner with Wharfedale Harriers. She has four daughters ranging from 9 to 13 years old.

Cathy Frobisher began her career working for the NHS, which sponsored her to go to Birmingham University where she obtained her foundation degree in Health and Social Care. She came to work for Janet almost three years ago.

 

 

 

 

 

Two things happened in the space of about twelve hours to prompt this post. First, I spent a little time last evening with one of the tenants of the supported housing of the small charity for which I work part time. Second, I read some comments responding to the latest post on Australian photographer Leanne Cole’s blog, which I follow from my photo blog.

I spent the time with Gordon, completely blinded and brain damaged in an accident when he was young. One of several of the tenants who have been known to say “I’m not disabled; I just can’t see”. But what was he doing last evening? Scaling the climbing wall at a local leisure centre while I watched safely from below (taking pictures and making a video clip).

Gordon, blind and with severe brain damage, nearing to top of a climbing wall on 27 June

Gordon, blind and with severe brain damage, nearing the top of a climbing wall on 27 June

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I don’t have a lot of time for blogging at the moment – the weather is superb for walking and photography but unfortunately that means it is also ideal for some much needed ‘tender loving care’ for Lofty, our beloved VW camper. However, having just cooked and eaten the obligatory full English breakfast I thought I’d use the 15 min ‘digestion’ pause to get this off.

The Romanians are almost uniquely able to have a joke on themselves and, being far better generally educated than the majority of people coming out of UK schools, are able to do it with a wit and substance sadly lacking in much of what we see from British commentators. I just love the poster campaign launched by the Romanian paper Gandul (‘The Thought?) in response to that from the Guardian. The posters are in English so English speakers can understand them even if the accompanying text is in Romanian.

http://www.gandul.info/news/why-don-t-you-come-over-raspunsul-gandul-la-campania-britanica-nu-veniti-in-anglia-update-10528548

So here are some of the Romanian poster words, each of which has a postscript “Why don’t you come over. We may not like Britain but you’ll love Romania”. There are many more gems. (more…)

“What’s with the ‘mafia’ in that factory?”, I asked my companion. Or, rather, what I actually said was “Ce este cu ‘mafia’ la fabrica asta?”, necessarily exercising my newly-acquired broken Romanian in my first few months as a volunteer in Romania. This was May 1993.

My companion in the train compartment was my landlady, who had kindly accompanied me on a train journey from Siret, in the far north of Romania, to Focsani, 300 kilometres south, to what I had been told was “The best factory for BCA building blocks in Romania”. We were now on the return journey.

Raluca, Alina and Ramona, l to r, with Ancuta behind. Four of the 'Bunnies', my delightful special needs class from School no.11, Suceava, in 1994. They are wearing T-shirts from a special needs school in Pensacola, Florida, with which the Bunnies did an email project (despite the headmaster's attitude which was that I was wasting my time trying to do such a thing with them. He had to eat his words, but more of that in a future post about the delights of teaching English in Romania.

Raluca, Alina and Ramona, l to r, with Ancuta behind. Four of the ‘Bunnies’, my delightful special needs class from School no.11, Suceava, in 1994. They are wearing dandelion coronets we made on the day, and T-shirts from a special needs school in Pensacola, Florida, with which the Bunnies did an email project (despite the headmaster’s attitude which was that I was wasting my time trying to do such a thing with them. He had to eat his words, but more of that in a future post about the delights of teaching English in Romania).

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I would like to introduce you to some remarkable people, having a go (yesterday) at something many of you ‘foodies’ reading this might do from time to time – making bread. Imagine doing that if you could not see, or had one or more additional severe ‘disabilities’ – physical or mental. Many of the people here, if they can speak but several of them cannot, will say “I’m not disabled, I just cannot see”. Their enthusiasm, zest for life and willingness to tackle anything, is an inspiration to me. As usual, just click on the first picture to see a slide show with a description of each picture.

I have mentioned that I work for a small charity in York (York, UK that is). As York’s oldest charity, the Wilberforce Trust has been supporting people with sight loss in and around York since 1833 (the year William Wilberforce’s died); it was set up – originally as the Yorkshire School for the Blind – in his memory that year.

Now, with a number of houses offering supported accommodation and a variety of services to the larger community, it specialises in supporting people with sight loss who have additional severe disabilities, including learning disabilities.

The introduction to bread-making is one of a number of activities  – a social club/games night, art activities, using computers and internet for people with sight loss, cooking, flower arranging, personal safety courses, and more – which take place in the ‘Living & Learning Zone’, a specialised community centre in the Wilberforce head office in Huntington, York, where I work a couple of days a week

Not all the participants in this session are shown; those who are know me very well so gladly allow me to take their picture; some who have newly joined Wilberforce activities did not yet want their photo taken.

I’d add that the supporters pictured here, both Wilberforce staff and volunteers, are remarkable people too.

My French is not good and I don’t usually open reblogs, but I understood the following:

“130 millions de femmes sont excisées chaque année dans le monde”

which ‘ben‘ had reblogged from:

Solidarité Ouvrière

Stopcircumcision

I knew there were many, but was shocked by the 150 million a year. If I was not aware of the extent of this, then for sure many others are unaware too. And this ‘news’ comes shortly after the growing awareness of the treatment of females in India, brought about by the recent arrests for rape and murder and the public protests resulting from this horrific act.

In the UK we are very aware that despite all the ‘hot air’ talk, many young women, and even girls, especially from the Pakistani community, are still forced into unwanted marriages and often suffer dreadful treatment, including massive physical abuse, as a consequence.

There are, of course, many other examples of these kinds of abuse.

We have a long way to go before we truly value the feminine half of humanity.

I don’t have a very large number of followers but I know that some of you do. Please spread the awareness in whatever way you can; feel free to reblog this is you wish.

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