Cover of The Mermaid and the BearIn my previous post I commented on the first half of Ailish Sinclair’s first novel, describing it as “having all the charm and magic of a good children’s story, wrapped up in an adult fairy tale.”

I do like a novel which surprises. The Mermaid and the Bear had plenty of surprises for me.

Sexy

Not far into the second half it became pretty sexy! I didn’t expect that, not from the first half of the story nor from Ailish’s blog posts. She slipped easily into an insight into an eighteen years old young woman’s discovery of the urgency of physical love when prompted by ‘true love’. I suspect few eighteen year olds experience that now.

The role of women deftly interwoven

Another surprise was how the author managed to get so much modern thinking about the role of women in a story set over 400 years ago, without it jarring. It will be no surprise to anyone who has read my posts for some years that this was a pleasant surprise for me; it’s been a regular theme for me (how little far we’ve come in 400 years!).

Stone circles

The stone circles of Aberdeenshire, of which I’ve learned a lot from Ailish’s posts, feature. I’m not sure whether Ailish really believes they are magical but she’s pretty much convinced me.

Witches’ from fact

I liked the way Ailish wove the Aberdeen witch trials of the 1590s in to the story without it becoming a ‘historical’ text book, fictionalising real people and events, mixing them up with invented characters (as I am wont to do).

Enjoyable

I really enjoyed this novel on multiple levels. It’s not the kind of story I’d usually read, detective thrillers are what usually tempt me – my Kindle library has a few of those and my physical bookcase contains only the complete works of Dickens.

The historical notes at the end of Ailish’s book are really helpful but I’d urge you not to read them until after you’ve read the story.

The Mermaid and the Bear is published by GWL Publishing and available on Amazon and in some book shops.