Communications


Photo of cup with a few coins in the hands of a beggar

Photo by York Press

A lot of bloggers make a little money selling their ‘products’ through their WordPress blogs – self-published books, courses in anything from writing or photography to cookery, using Photoshop or other applications, and a wide variety of other products. Of course I cannot have any objection to that; it seems to me that it’s a valid use of a blog. I have some sympathy also with students who offer something in return for a small ‘donation’.

But when it comes to what amounts to ‘begging’, the on-line equivalent of sitting in the street with a begging bowl, I find it difficult to accept. It works at various levels.

Sponsorship

First there are the requests to ‘sponsor’ a blog, the argument being ‘if you like reading my blog please give me some money to allow me to continue’. What about the millions of bloggers who just give us a good read, often giving excellent advice too (foodie and photography blogs spring to mind), fitting their blogging activity around the ‘day job’?

Donate

Then there’s the ‘donate’ button. This is often accompanied by a text with an explanation similar to that given with requests for ‘sponsorship’.

On-line begging bowl

Finally, there’s the simple on-line equivalent of the begging bowl, a blog post which just asks for money because the blogger needs money for anything from day to day living to help with medical bills.

Many of us will respond to the street beggar with a little money or, better, a hot drink or some food when they seem to be a genuine case of hardship. Money needs more thought as it will often go on drugs. And of course there are the street beggars who have a daily take only dreamed of by many hardworking people with a ‘day job’. Spotting them can be difficult as they are often put on the street by a ‘minder’ who takes most of the money. This is particularly prevalent in Romania.

What brought on this post?

There’s a Romanian blogger who I’ve followed for a few years. As the number of posts asking for money increased my reading of his posts, usually several a day, has decreased. I have in the past bought some of his ‘products’, more as a way of giving a bit of help than that I wanted the ‘product’. But now, for me, he’s overstepped the mark.

His latest story is that he will be made homeless unless he pays overdue rent of several hundred dollars. It began with requests to help with dental bills. I had some sympathy with that as it would be difficult to work well if in continual pain. Bloggers sent him really substantial sums of money. Then he asked for money to buy a video camera to make his video clips. My sympathy evaporated but it seems he received the money. Then the story was that his laptop had crashed and he needed money to buy a new one. Again he seemed to receive it readily. Now he says he hasn’t been able to pay his rent and will shortly be evicted, made homeless!

Romanians to whom I’ve related this story have been furious; it’s the kind of story which has brought Romania into disrepute. Having worked with Romanians for over a decade and spending a lot of time in the country since, I can assure you that most Romanians are hardworking given the opportunity (for many this, sadly, meant emigrating).

As I said above, I no longer read many of this blogger’s posts but was drawn to comment on one recently, one of several which seemed to assume that we all want a large number of followers. I felt obliged to point out that not all bloggers want this and gave the reasons; in my case because I try to respond to all comments and ‘likes’ (with some exceptions) and I just could not deal with large numbers.

How many comments ‘not approved’?

What is really sad is that my comment on his blog, which did include a mild admonishment about ‘begging’, was not approved so no one other than the blogger in question has seen it. So I must assume that any other comments expressing unease about ‘begging’ have been similarly withheld.

So, I have to ask here: do you think this type of ‘begging via blog’ is acceptable or not, and which type oversteps the mark? Do you think I’m being unreasonable?

 

Most people who know me know that I dislike Facebook intensely; I’ve said so on here several times. Nevertheless I have a Facebook account as it is useful for small ‘closed’ groups, like our writers’ club, a project I did with a group of teenagers in our village and even my ‘daily journals’ following our summer trips to Romania during which I had limited access to internet.

It’s also useful for ‘Messenger’ for brief communications with someone you know opens it regularly but otherwise, for anything important, it’s better to go to email as Messenger messages are often ignored.

As far as the Romania trip is concerned, I’ve begun to receive ‘requests’ to join the group from people whose names mean nothing to me. What is really strange is that, typical of Facebook, they say nothing about themselves. Consequently, such requests are ignored.

Facebook laziness

It could be they read about the group on this blog as I’ve referred to it a time or two but, if so, why on earth don’t they say so? Facebook inspired laziness I think; now, for so many things you just ‘push a button’ not needing to write a word. Yes, it’s good to have a reminder of a friend’s birthday but for heaven’s sake write a personal message to them! (But take care, they may be telling a ‘porky’ in their profile 😳).

’Publicize’

For quite a while the ‘Publicize’ facility of WordPress was turned on on this blog, putting a short summary of posts on Facebook and Twitter (I never selected the other options). A few posts ago I turned this off. One of the problems with this facility is that Facebook may choose the least relevant picture if there are more than one, people putting a ‘like’ on that having never read the post. As pictures I put on a post are always an integral part of the post the ‘like’ doesn’t mean a lot. I reckon if anyone is really interested in what I have to say they’ll follow the blog.

Very occasionally I may turn ‘publicize’ on to tell the tightly restricted group of ‘friends’ on Facebook (who may or may not be friends) of a particular post which may be of special interest to them, excluding those who, for whatever reason, I don’t want to point to it.

Of course a ‘like’ from someone I don’t know on this blog is always welcome because, as I said in yesterday’s post, it often sets me off on a journey to other realms as I almost always follow up with a visit to the blogger’s site.

WordPress reader

Nevertheless, I have noticed a similar problem to that with ‘publicize’ with the WordPress reader. It’s hard to avoid the conclusion that some of the ‘likers’ have not read the complete post, just putting a ‘like’ on the introductory few words and the one picture which accompanies it. If I put a ‘like’ on a post you can be sure I’ve pushed the ‘visit site’ button, read the whole thing and seen all the pictures.

As I’ve said before, the above comments may not apply to anyone using their blog to promote a business, whether it is declared as such or not (eg, those asking for a donation in some way, or promoting a book they have on Amazon).

One of the most irritating things about the emails I get saying my blogs’ SEOs could be improved, so I could get much more traffic, is that the sender clearly hasn’t read my blog, though they sometimes claim to have “analysed” my site(s). In the first place I don’t want “more traffic”; in the second if I did need advice on improving the SEO (I do know quite a bit about the subject) I have two delightful lady followers in Bucharest, who do read my posts regularly, to whom I would go. Anyway, I write whatever comes into my head and analysing it for SEO etc would spoil the whole blogging process for me. Of course, if my blog(s) were about promoting a business I’d have a different attitude

Why not more traffic?

Why don’t I want more traffic? Because I try to go to the blog of every blogger who follows me or leaves a ‘like’ and, even more so, who leaves a comment and, if I decide to follow them, to each of their posts; I just could not handle a very large number as some bloggers seem to do. Moreover, this gives what is, for me, an ideal way of adding to the list of blogs which I follow. As I’ve said before, I don’t put likes or comments on the summary in reader; I go to the actual blog, so it could become too time-consuming if I followed very many people. In fact I could prune the present list a bit as some seem no longer to be blogging.

Reblogs

I rarely read reblogs and even more rarely reblog. If I want to promote a post I will usually have something to say about it and urge my readers to have a look at it, giving a link to the blog. Reblogging seems to me a bit lazy.

Blog ‘chats’ rather than ‘comments’

An additional factor is that I enjoy having a ‘chat’ with the other blogger, when I have something to say. If not I might just put a ‘like’ on the post. Occasionally I may add a one word comment. However the ‘chats’ can sometimes develop into a series of ‘comments’ and ‘replies’. From time to time the exchanges can become too personal, in my view, to be public so may transfer to email. All this means that following a large number of bloggers is not possible, for me.

SEO? Mine may not be as good as they could be but are good enough for me.

Does ‘promoting’ posts on Facebook and/or Twitter do more harm than good? It seems to me that readers often stick a ‘like’ on the FB/twit summary or photo without ever going to read the post.

As I said in a recent post, I’ve become more and more disillusioned with these other two ‘social media’, often superficial and frequently ‘nasty’, and have severely cut my use of them but until recently assumed ‘promoting’ WordPress posts on the other two platforms would be a useful way to reach a wider audience. I’m coming to the conclusion that it is, in fact, counter productive.

Anyone else think the same?

PS. Since writing the post referred to in the link above, sick of Trump’news’ and La La Land bull I now listen to BBC radio in the afternoons far less, and don’t watch BBC tv news at 6pm regularly. So I’m writing far more, including getting back into regular blogging and, more important, reading others’.

I’ve always disliked Facebook. After resisting it for years I finally succumbed when teenagers in a project I ran in the village where I live said it was the best way to communicate with them. For this I created a private group. Later our local writers’ club created a private FB group and that remains very useful.

I have found limited use of Twitter useful too – letting me know of new posts from blogger friends who do not have a ‘follow’ possibility on their non-Wordpress sites but ‘boost’ their posts on Twitter, and to let friends who do not use WordPress, and do not wish to follow by email, of my new blog posts.

But the love affairs with FB and Twitter, if they ever existed, are over. On the other hand, my love for radio has regrown over the past few months. The following rundown refers, of course, to when I am home alone on weekdays.

Twitter

After signing up to FB and Twitter I was rapidly bombarded by ‘suggestions’  for new groups/people to ‘follow’. In Twitter particularly posts appear regularly from organisations or people I have not ‘chosen’. Almost never are these of interest. On the other hand I did sign up to several favourite musicians but most of these are just promotional rather than containing interesting information. Then there are ‘friends’ who rarely post anything original, they just ‘share’ posts from others. Again, these are rarely of interest. In Twitter particularly annoying are multiple, lots, of posts per day, and many repeats; TES (more sensibly named in the past Times Educational Supplement), which I chose to follow because my wife is a teacher, is really irritating in the respect. It’s no longer followed but I continue to follow GuardianTeach. (In the past I unfollowed quite a few WordPress bloggers who blogged multiple times a day and bunged up my reader and/or inbox).

Facebook

As far as FB is concerned, it seems often to bring out the very worst in people. One recent example was prompted by a mildly contentious post on the WordPress site/blog I do for the village in which I live. It concerned an organisation run by someone with whom I am regularly in contact; in fact only a few days before she had emailed me for some help, which I had given. However, when she did not like the post on the village site did she comment there or approach me directly? No, she posted her objection on a village FB page and, of course, this was followed by a host of FBers joining in.

The village FB page, despite the pinned post asking that posts be limited to “Anything that adds life to the village”, probably has more that do not do this than do, and so many are barely disguised advertising. Many have nothing at all to do with the village other than they may have been written by someone who lives in it but often promote events, and businesses elsewhere (and of course self-promotion is rife). I’m only too aware of the problems for the admin to control this. 

Going to ‘home’, the reader is littered with ‘suggested posts’ and advertisements which are almost never of interest, and other ads are often promoting ‘scams’.

Messenger

Something I do like is ‘Messenger’. Very useful for short communications with friends and ‘friends’, including my wife. It’s become even more useful as free WiFi has been introduced on local bus and train services. The telephone and texting have become almost redundant!

Drastic prune underway

I’m sure that anyone running a business should be using FB and Twitter but I do not so they have become more and more irritating and time wasting. Recently I decided to do a drastic prune of both. I am now in the process reducing ‘follows’ to a small number of friends (in the original sense) and an even smaller number of organisations with which I am involved in some way. I’ve not yet completed the job but already my daily FB and Twitter trawl is quicker and much more relevant. One of the first to go was the village FB group mentioned.

Radio

On the other hand a love of radio way in the past has been revived. It’s not perfect, but so much less superficial than tv. The few minute bites on tv usually leave me with a host of unanswered questions; more often than not a radio programme tackling the same subject satisfies my information need.

Classic FM

Most mornings I have Classic FM on the radio; I deliberately did not say I ‘listen’ to it!’ I have found a perfect low volume at which the music is a pleasant background but the majority of presenters’ interjections can be ignored and, even more important, so can the advertisements the perpetrators of which seem to have the view that the Classic FM audience is either senile or stupid.The station has improved a lot recently by running fewer of the assinine ads and also by airing the musical pot-boilers less frequently and introducing me to many new pieces and even previously unknown, to me, composers. I have found that I have a volume control in my head which I can wind up if something interesting or I wish to stop and listen to comes on.

I find the women presenters far more acceptable than the males with one exception, Aled Jones (and every time his rendition of Handel’s ‘Have you heard my lady’ is aired I wind up my in-ear volume control to experience the exquisite tingling in the spine which his voice and amazingly clear diction always provoke). 

At 1pm I switch to BBC4 to catch up on what to the media is the most important news, following which I get a host of facts and opinions on everything from gardening (even though I do not have a garden) to finances, books, science, medicine and the tortuous thinking behind Round Britain Quiz. I don’t switch off the Archers though I might use the 15min intermission to do some urgent small job. Although the 45 minute drama at 2.15pm is of variable quality it is always interesting to me as a would-be writer. I may make it until 5pm at which point I usually turn my attention to preparing the evening meal, often a bit before that.

Of course another advantage of radio over tv is that you can often do other things while listening, as I usually do. When the radio is in ‘background’ mode this includes writing, as now.

TV

At 6pm on goes the tv for the news as we sit down to our evening meal; I stick with BBC 1 mainly because I like to watch Look North, especially if my three favourite presenters – Lara Rostrom, Charlotte Leeming and Tanya Arnold – are on air. Lara is a fairly recent addition (a year?) but Charlotte and Tanya are old hands and whatever else I just enjoy watching the professionalism of all three (Tanya is a surprise as I’m not generally interested in sport!).

Back to blogging

Culling FB and Twitter should, I hope, allow more opportunity for blogging, both reading blogs – usually so much less superficial than FB and T – and writing them – so much more enjoyable!

Anyone who has followed this blog for any length of time will know that a hobby horse of mine is the insufficient recognition of the contribution made to our society by women. I know that I’m a couple of days late but Sunday was International Women’s Day so I wanted to feature some specific women and, what is more, women entrepreneurs. So, I’ve chosen two such women, and their two female colleagues, who have recently launched a venture which could be very good for the village in which I live, although they do not live here, and in which I have become involved in a small way.

The team which has brought a new community magazine to my Wharfedale village, Menston.  L to R, Louise Atkinson, partner and graphic designer, Cathy Frobisher , Office Manager, Janet-Alison  Arkright , Partner and 'Sales Contributor', and   Andrea Kerman, Sales Person, at the reception in their offices in Haworth, each holding the first edition of the new magazine.

The all-female team which has brought a new community magazine to my Wharfedale village, Menston. Left to Right: Louise Atkinson, Partner and Graphic Designer; Cathy Frobisher, Office Manager; Janet-Alison Arkright , Partner and ‘Sales Contributor’; and Andrea Kerman, Sales Person. Proudly showing the first edition of the magazine open at the Menston pages.

From the village in which lived three extraordinary women who through their writings put the Yorkshire village of Haworth and Yorkshire on the world map – the Bronte sisters of course – this quartet – all mothers with young children, continue what Charlotte, Emily and Anne began.

Menston section of the new community magazine 'It's the business', covering postcode area LS29

Menston section of the new community magazine ‘It’s the business’, covering postcode area LS29 in Wharfedale, Yorkshire

My small contribution to the venture is to write the Menston page and compile the list of events and activities in Menston village. This fits in very well with doing the same thing for what I call the ‘alternative’ Menston website:
http://menstonvillagewharfedale.com

My village’s community activities thrive on the efforts of a lot of remarkable women who live in Menston; many of them are volunteers for a wide range of community organisations ranging from offering support to the elderly to a female choir or arranging events to raise money for victims of the Philippines typhoon Haiyan; several are entepreneurs who run their own businesses, ranging from the village bakery to a fitness studio offering Pilates sessions.

Going back to the female team behind the new magazine, all are mothers and the two partners also run other businesses as well as caring for the family:

Janet-Alison Arkwright has three young sons and a collection of rescue dogs and cats at home. Now qualified in Business, Finance and Law, Janet started as a cleaner at Airedale Hospital but eventually became Cancer Information Officer. She subsequently worked for top names like Asda, worked part-time on the business side for another local magazine and set up her own cleaning company, JA Services Ltd, which she still runs in Haworth. She manages to find the time too for competitive fell running as a member of Keighley and Craven Athletics Club.

Louise Atkinson has a son at primary school. She has a B Tech in graphic design and worked for several years in the print industry covering every aspect. Almost seven years ago she set up her own print company and runs that, KTG Design and Print, and offers graphic design services from Stanbury, close to Haworth. 

Andrea Kerman began work with Magnet, a well-known local kitchen manufacturer, then after a period with a knitting yarns supplier spent several years with the Inland Revenue. She is also a competitive fell runner with Wharfedale Harriers. She has four daughters ranging from 9 to 13 years old.

Cathy Frobisher began her career working for the NHS, which sponsored her to go to Birmingham University where she obtained her foundation degree in Health and Social Care. She came to work for Janet almost three years ago.

 

 

 

 

 

Yet another of my favourite blogs has announced a transfer from WordPress.com to WordPress.org; this time he not only announced it but did it within hours, and so has disappeared completely off the blogging scene (‘server error’ message only). I’m posting this ‘comment’ to both my blogs in the hope he and the others may see it.

But I don’t think bloggers contemplating this move realise that even when the new site works it is so much more complicated for people to ‘like’, follow and comment. (more…)

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