Today I discovered senryū, thanks to Ellen Grace Olinger (a blogging poet I’ve followed for a few years) and, through her, Charlotte Digregorio. (Of course whether those Japanese characters in my title line are correct I do not know).

Haiku

Recently I wrote a post about my dissatisfaction with my attempts at haiku, and sadly most of the attempts of others other than Japanese poets (who I have no way to judge). Now it is clear to me that many that I have read, even most, are closer to sanryū than haiku and one reason, at least, for my dissatisfaction.

Haibun and ‘senbun’

It also explains in part why I am having difficulty keeping my daily diary for my current travels as haibun, which require at least a closing haiku. It seems to me that it will be easier, and more appropriate, to sometimes close with senryū rather than haiku, but the result will not then be haibun. Maybe I can call them senbun.

Senryū

A screenshot of the haiku and senryū page on the Shadow Poetry siteThe ‘English’ senryū, follows the syllable count of a haiku – 5,7,5 (the only form which interests me) – but is “usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku” (Shadow Poetry). What seems to me a good start to understanding haiku is also on Shadow Poetry.

This also makes clear why 17 syllables in English is not equivalent to 17 Japanese kana (the Japanese writing system) characters (Japanese syllables), though I prefer to follow this ‘rule’ when attempting haiku. One of the characteristics of haiku which draws me to them is the discipline involved in writing them, and part of this discipline for a Japanese poet is following the rule of 5,7,5 kama characters. Throwing this discipline aside because kama characters are not equivalent to English syllables seems to me a lame excuse. The result may be great short poems but to me they have lost some of the appeal of haiku.

With all this in mind I may succeed better in turning my rough diary notes into acceptable haibun or ‘senbun’. I’ve only succeeded with July 29th and 31st (under menu heading ‘Dusty2RomaniaII’) so far though the consequences of the appalling weather since we left Holland have had a large part to play too.

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Around 2,400km (1,500 miles) from Hook of Holland to Iași if there were no diversions, but by the time we’ve found campsites and visited friends on the way our forthcoming drive to Romania will probably be more like 2,600km (1,600 miles +). Add 250 miles (400km) from home to the ferry port at Harwich and the round trip will probably be something not much short of 6,000km (3,500 miles) though we may not follow the same route back. We’ll probably do a few hundred km while in Romania.

Map showing the approximate route we will take from Hook of Holland to Iași

The approximate route from Hook of Holland to Iași.

We will not take the more usual route from our home in Yorkshire to Harwich – A1, A14, A120. It’s a nightmare. So a more leisurely drive through Lincolnshire, Norfolk and Suffolk, pitching our little 2-person tent for the night near Harwich.

New menu heading for ‘grumpytyke’

The eagle eyed among you may spot a new menu heading on this blog -‘Dusty2RomaniaII‘.

’That, I hope, will become a daily diary – the first time I’ve attempted one. If you click on that menu you will see a drop down list of days till we arrive home. Each will open a new page. If all goes well, although I will probably not be able to post every day, I will write each day and each of those days will eventually be filled. (I haven’t completed all the links but there’ll be time after we arrive in Iasi).

A more ‘literary’ diary?

My intention is not to write a conventional diary, but in deference to the writers’ club to which I belong – Writing on the Wharfe – I’m aiming for it to be a literary adventure (at least for me). All might become clear when the first day has some content.

It will be supplemented now and then by more usual blog posts.


Our first drive to Romania and back in 2006, in ‘Mini’, our 1975 classic mini, was not documented. In 2015 we did it in Lofty, our 1972 Bay VW camper, documented in a somewhat hit and miss fashion on Facebook as ‘Lofty2Romania’. Last year we did it in Dusty, our 2013 Dacia Duster, so ‘Dusty2Romania’, again documented after a fashion on FB, both being rather longer trips as we took to the mountains of Transylvania.

However, I’m so fed up with FB now I hardly look at it, never mind posting to it, so decided to give grumpytyke a chance to show what he’s made of, thus ‘Dusty2RomaniaII.

With a flat calm sea the long crossing from Hook of Holland is boring. It did, however, allow me to catch up on posts from bloggers I follow and leave a few comments.

As we’re approaching Harwich now so I don’t know for how long we’ll have internet, I’ll not fiddle with the html to change the font so please excuse the small text.

I promised one of my blogger friends, Iulia Halatz, an English teacher living in Bucharest, that I would sometime attempt a Fibonacci poem after she had pointed to one by Mick E Talbot. This long crossing seemed an ideal opportunity to fulfil the promise. So, for Iulia, here is one about the sea.

Sea.

Calm.

Chaos 

just waiting

to unleash itself;

waves battering the silent air

till it too is a maelstrom of chaotic water.

Destroying all when in the mood, how can we love such a thing? Yet, for all that, we do.

As so often in Romania, things are not as they seem nor as you have been told.

The necessary legal documents to buy the ‘dream house’ (see previous post) were not in order as we had been assured they were and, more important, the elderly lady – D-na Saveta – owning it has two daughters, one of whom was keen for her to sell it but the other – who wasn’t answering the phone or communicating in any way – didn’t want her to sell it at all it turned out. She needs ‘permission’, and a legal agreement, from both to sell it.

We haven’t yet given up entirely but it seems unlikely; to get the documents in order would take at least a year (though that time scale would not be a problem for us).

Tomorrow we’re hoping to have another chat with D-na Saveta after erecting the tents in the garden here to dry as we packed them rather damp in Săliște. It should be sunny here tomorrow morning.

The route back – first part

Map of route we aim to follow from Campulung Moldovenesc to Budapest

So, we are back in the Bucovina having spent about a week in Săliște, Sibiu, returning to Iași on Thursday. The villages and small towns around the city of  Sibiu are quite wonderful with their multi-coloured, well maintained saș (saxon) architecture. I put a few pix on my Facebook journal, Dusty2Romania, but Petronela has put far more on her Facebook. Having ‘done’ the spectacular ‘Transfagărășanul’ last year we thought we’d try Romania’s highest main road – Transalpina, 2,145 metres – this year. I wasn’t so impressed though it seems extremely popular with motorcyclists and occasional cyclists.

Very noticable throughout Romania was a massive increase in the number of cyclists – lycra, helmets and all – not only foreign tourists but many Romanians.

Back in Bucovina

We arrived at my ‘honorary grandmother’s’ house, just 7km before Câmpulung Moldovenesc, a couple of hours ago. We will leave most probably on Monday to follow the route shown above rather than the way we came, via Baia Mare, Sighet and Borșa, so then skirting the Ukrainian border. There is camping at the spa town of Marghita (not named on the Google map above but the last thick black circle before the Romania/Hungary border I think) so we aim to spend a night there then on to Budapest, where we have selected another campsite.

We will then go through Budapest, hopefully avoiding the M0 motorway around the south of the city which is a really scary drive – maniac Hungarian drivers sticking 2 metres from your boot at 90mph – on the way to Austria then Germany but haven’t decided on a route yet. So far we have seen four bad accidents this trip, one on that Budapest ring road and one today on the way here from Iași which, to get round it, took us on what was really a forest footpath – fun in other circumstances.

We fancy trying to pick up the Rhine valley which we really enjoyed in the classic mini in 2006, where there were some excellent campsites. I’ll probably be able to do another post somewhere along that route.

A week of sorting, packing, searching for campsites on our route, about 1,700 miles, from Menston, Yorkshire in the UK to Iași in north Romania, including the ferry crossing.

We’ve done this journey three times before though never following quite the same route: in 2006 in Mini, our 1975 classic mini via the Rhine valley; two years ago in Lofty, our 1972 VW bay camper by the most direct route. The first time was in 2000 when we’d flown to the UK for my mother’s 80th birthday then took a Honda Accord back to Romania (after getting married at three days notice!). This year we’ll make a small diversion from the direct route, camping in Holland, then through northern Germany avoiding Cologne but after that on the direct route, hoping for fewer long hold-ups than two years ago.

Map showing approximate route from Hook of Holland to Iasi in Romania

Approximate route

There will be a few small diversions to camp sites but not counting these the total journey is about 1,680 miles (2,700km).

Facebook group for brief diary

As I did two years ago I’ve made a Facebook group

Dusty2Romania

to, hopefully, post a daily brief diary when we have internet access. You’re very welcome to follow us there if you use Facebook. Facebook being what it is I’ve made the group closed, but if you’re not already a member (I made many friends – in the real sense of the word – members  already) just ask. I aim to supplement the brief Facebook entries with more substantial blog posts, which I much prefer, here when possible.

Menston to Harwich (nearly)

First stage, tomorrow, down to Harwich where we’ll take the ferry to Hook of Holland on Tuesday morning. We’ve booked into a campsite at Bradfield, near Manningtree, about 8 miles from the ferry terminal, recently refurbished I understand, for Monday night. It’s behind a pub; we’re hoping that’s good for a meal so we don’t have to cook. I’ll let you know how it is.

I don’t follow the Bucket List Publications blog for the adventure – I think life is an adventure enough without looking for more – and I don’t make ‘bucket lists’ – again because life has always presented me with enough goals and challenges without making more – but I enjoy Lesley Carter’s blog though in many respects our mindsets are completely different. Nevertheless, I thought she deserved my vote, so got it, and she deserves yours too.

Her determination to win the ‘My Destination’ contest has been quite something to follow.

As a former journalist I couldn’t resist her invitation to interview her about it so I sent her some questions and got back the replies below. (more…)