Several members of our local writers’ club, Writing on the Wharfe, took a break from writing on Saturday evening to take part in a ‘crime party’, organised by our founder/leader Ruxandra. I was not keen but went along to support Ruxandra.

I’m glad I did. I’ve never laughed so much at a ‘party’. The words spoken by each character were of course scripted but the cast being made up of writers there was a great deal of ad libbing, often hilarious.

If your club is getting rather ‘dry’ (ours was not) and needs an energising boot I can recommend the activity.

The ‘cast’: Pointing fingers accuse! Back row, l to r, gipsy fortune teller. grieving widow, retired army general, butler, victim’s lover, local PC and moonlighting stripper. On the sofa, the maid, academic and the murderer, French detective, chauffeur. At the front, the cook.

A ‘new’ word for my vocabulary

Ariana Savalas performing No Diggity with PMJ

Listening to PMJ (Postmodern Jukebox) today I was introduced to a new word, by somebody commenting on Ariana Savalas performing No Diggity. What a perfect word for a perfect performance.

The word? Eargasm

Another perfect performance giving me an eargasm, though I didn’t know the word then, was introduced to me the day before by my blogging friend Ilze. This was Miche Braden performing a blues cover of Prince‘s Purple Rain. Ilze had sometime earlier introduced me to PMJ.

PMJ’s pianist and founder of PMJ I believe is extraordinary – brilliant.

Anyone reading this blog for a while, or my ‘about’, will know me as a ‘classical music’ fan; in fact most of the day I have music from Classic FM playing. Until now my alternative has been Romanian ‘musica populara’. But I’ve now found another great alternative for when the Classic FM presenter (only a small number of the men, none of the women!) or programme irritates me.

Top of the list of irritating presenters is Alexander Armstrong with his unwitty, pointless  ‘wit’ and horrible presenting style. Thank heavens the station seems to have stopped playing his attempts to sing: he has a passable voice but he cannot sing.

One irritating programme is a kind of top of the pops (in which he figured for some time) which, based on the best  selling so called ‘classical music’ of the week, not surprisingly mixes some truly great music with a proportion of, to my ear, rubbish.

Definitely earache not eargasm!

PS. Ariana Savalas is Telly Savalas‘s daughter, so the fact I’d never heard of her shows how out of touch I’ve been. And the fact that I find most of PMJ’s covers better than the originals probably says much the same.

 

Silouttes of small spider and web with witchI rarely come across British English words in my everyday reading which I do not know, I suppose not surprising as I’ve been an avid reader for much of my life since I was three years old. However, looking up a word – which I’d come across recently – in the on-line Oxford dictionary I found myself subscribing to its ‘word a day‘ service. Fascinating!

So far it seems I’m given a word I do not know, or the meaning of which I cannot deduce, about once every five to ten days; sometimes that the word can also be heard spoken is helpful when the pronunciation is not obvious (to me).

Spiderlings and carlins

A recent word the meaning of which could be easily deduced was ‘spiderling‘ – a baby spider – though I’d never heard it before. Today’s word, ‘carlin‘, I’d never met and I hadn’t any idea what it could mean. It means ‘witch‘, deriving from Middle English, in turn from Old Norse – ‘kerling’ meaning an old woman. What I find particularly interesting is that the Old Norse word means ‘old woman’, even just ‘woman’ without the supernatural powers. However, so often have old women, especially those bent and wizened, been regarded as witches!

Most popular words

Looking at the five words said to be the most popular in the world at the moment, I was surprised to see ‘POV‘ given as the most popular: surely it’s an acronym – ‘point of view’ – which I do not regard as a ‘word’, but maybe I’m out of step here. No surprise to see ‘retweet‘ in second place (one reason I’ve abandoned twitter). Other surprises are ‘lughole‘ though its meaning is well known to tykes like me – ear – though we’d pronounce it “lug’ole”.  ‘Alguacil‘ in third place is surprising until you remember that Spanish is becoming the most used language on the planet; I can think of no explanation for ‘cytopenia‘ being in fourth place unless it’s because of frequent use in medical journals as a result of discussions about cancer.

For those of you who do not know the Oxford Dictionary service, if you subscribe to it you get an email each day with the ‘word of the day’ and clicking on the word takes you to the definition(s) and pronunciation.

It’s not really surprising I had not come across ‘carlin’ as it’s Scottish, not English, but the two words – spiderling and carlin – prompted me to dash off the following bit of doggerel.

There once was a spiderling spinning his web
But just when his keeness was starting to ebb
Along came a carlin with her sharp besom broom
Intent on a rare cleaning of her dark, dingy room
Cruelly dashing our spiderling’s hope of ever being a web-spin celeb.

A picture of The famous Roman acrostic (and palindrome) or word square in Cirencester in the UK.

The famous Roman acrostic (and palindrome) or word square in Cirencester in UK.

I so love this blogging world. Over the years I have made blogging friends (friends in the true sense) from several countries; I have learnt so much about things of which I would not even have been aware were I not an avid reader of other blogs; and recently, the day before yesterday, I added a new word to my vocabulary, a rare occurrence having been an insatiable reader of books of many kinds for around three quarters of a century. I’m as excited as I would be finding a rare piece of ancient Chinese porcelain for 10p at a car boot or flea market. The word is: Rambunctious

As an aspiring writer (of fiction – I had a successful career in what you might call ‘documentary writing’), reading something with excellent use of the vast English vocabulary thrills me; lazy writing, with restricted vocabulary, makes me despair, the overwhelming example now being the liberal sprinkling of ‘the f… word’ throughout a piece. I’m no prude; it used to be a good word to use when riled; now, it having been made meaningless, we have been left without such a word.

Rambunctious – an 19th century north American word

Back to rambunctious; a little research found that it was was a north American word coined in the early to mid 19th century and, surprise, used in the Financial Times in 2011.  I was so excited at its discovery I just had to use it; I’m no poet but I decided to rush off an acrostic poem for today’s meeting of our writers’ club, ‘Writing on the Wharfe’. Here it is:

Rare is the day when
After years of devouring books –
Many times, when young, with a torch,
Blankets over my head
Until the battery failed –
New words, or even just one, are added to my vocabulary.
Came a blogger new to me,
Tasted, drawn by, my comments to another blogger friend,
Introducing her young grandsons as ‘rambunctious’.
Oh what a word to savour!
Uncontrollably exuberant, wildly boisterous,
Such am I today – rambunctious

Thanks are due to ‘atticsister’, an antique dealer and blogger from Illinois who was brought to my blog by my comments on the blog of my good blogger friend Ilze from Latvia. She described her grandsons as rambunctious. What is more, she also described them as ‘tikes’, calling to mind my own grandmother who often called me and my younger brothers that when we were being unruly.