Photo of the largest pot of Marmite available - 500gOne of those tiresome days today. After answering a few emails in Wetherspoon and commiserating with my blogger friend in Latvia, Ilze, who was also having a ‘bad’ day, I began to look for the missing parts of my ‘long short story’ on the iPad.

The iPad wasn’t very well charged so with it about to give up, unable to search for the missing parts of the story any more, I moved to the library, where I can charge it. Then I found that I had not put the charger in my bag this morning. I couldn’t believe it. No more searching of the iPad possible.

Password protected – password forgotten

I then remembered that I had put some of the story on password protected pages on this blog. Maybe the missing parts were there. There followed a lot of problems logging into one of the library computers (haven’t done it for years) but when I finally succeeded the network was very slow. Then I found that the password to access the pages wasn’t what I thought.  Eventually I worked out I could change them from password protected to privately published so finally I was able to access them, only to find they didn’t contain the latest version when I left the story way back in June, I think.

Very frustrating. I needed to do a little shopping but having done that there was no more time to go somewhere more interesting and having fired myself up to continue the story I’m not motivated to do something else.

Then I realised that I had forgotten the main thing I went to the shop for – avocado for this evening. Fortunately I got a big pot of Marmite (I’m a lover, Petronela is a hater) so I consoled myself by putting an extraordinary amount of it on my slice of bread for lunch.

Now I’m back home so on the old MacBook while the iPad charges. A pot of tea (Yorkshire tea of course) drunk I feel fine 🙂 .

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It’s a while since I wrote anything about food so, having used some recipes picked up from bloggers I follow, the Chef Mimi Blog, My French Heaven and Rabbit Food, as a basis for some meals, and really enjoyed them, it seemed an ideal time to return to one of my favourite themes. But before that …

Tea

I should have a ‘grump’ about the marketing of Yorkshire tea. When I was unwell last year I completely ‘went off’ the 1/2 litre of very, very strong coffee (very sweet) I previously thought indispensable to get going in the morning, so began to drink tea (no sugar) first thing (about 6.00). At this time I also changed from ‘normal’ Yorkshire tea to ‘Gold’ Yorkshire tea (a bit stronger) but, although the shops were stuffed with teabags of the stuff, finding loose leaf tea proved very difficult. Then Taylors of Harrogate, which markets the brand, began a big push, joining up with Classic FM radio, sponsoring concerts, etc, but it was still difficult to find packets of loose leaf ‘Gold’. I wrote to Taylors pointing out that this was a cardinal marketing sin. Customer service were very helpful but that’s not the point. I have now found that the biggest Tesco supermarkets keep it though often there are only a couple of packets, if any, on the shelf. Today I found eight; I bought the lot!

Some like it hot – especially French chickens

I’m grateful to Chef Mimi as although in the past I followed My French Heaven closely I missed the ‘My Tangy Green Chicken’ in February last year. I’ve been roasting chickens for 60 years or more but I learned something surprising – to roast the chicken at 480degF ! Funny to find a chef in France using Fahrenheit (I know); we don’t even use it now in the UK – near as dammit 250degC. I suppose I could have used this temperature, unknowingly, when I was cooking on an old coal-fired range some 50 to 60 years ago (my grandmother used butter-tub slats, so wood soaked with butter, thrown out by the local coop, to get a high temperature; the oven bottom was red!) I don’t think my modern oven reaches quite 250; I shoved it on max and that’s what I’ll use in future.

Having found a free-range corn-fed chicken and all the other ingredients for Stephane’s (My French Heaven) recipe I followed his Tangy Green Chicken recipe. Wonderful. I did use olive oil, not the canola oil he stipulates, but other than that followed his recipe faithfully. Not surprisingly many queried his stipulated temperature but he was adamant. Rightly so , the result is wonderful. Chef Mimi made some changes for her ‘Roast chicken with olives‘, partly because all the ingredients seemed not to be readily available in her part of the USA, but I’m sure that her version is delicious too.

Rabbit Food

I’ve mentioned before that my wife and I eat ‘veggie’ twice a week, on Wednesdays and Fridays, so it’s always good to find something different without meat. Corrie-Louise will also give you a laugh on her Rabbit Food blog. Her recipe for ‘My Mum’s Red Pepper Lasagne‘ looked interesting but finding that it had no white sauce (I always make bechamel), to me one of the best bits, I decided to make just the pepper and tomato ragout from her recipe and serve it with a less work-intensive pasta, or rather two: whole wheat spaghetti and the little twirled ‘trofie’. Her recipe uses fresh tomatoes but I used tinned – less work – and rather then cheddar I put a good helping of Parmesan on top. Very tasty! (No idea what quinoa is).

 

Because I have no particular theme for this blog, I am often torn between several subjects. I’ve shunted off classic photography to another blog, but even that’s a problem as there are so many commonalities between cooking, which I often write about on this blog, and the processing side of ‘classic’ photography (ie on film) – measuring, timing, weighing, careful attention, care (even love) – come to think of it, much of that applies to the taking of photographs too.

fragi

Fragi – tiny Romanian wild strawberries

As I’ve said before, I’ve no need of the WordPress daily prompts; my problem is how to find the time to write about everything which motivates me to write, especially as I have an hiatus in my soujourns on internet as I spend two days away from home attending to the ‘communications’ needs of the small charity for which I work (and I’ve recently introduced  a weekly blog for that, though it’s a very simple one).

Then there’s the whole ‘grump’ thing; I originally set up this blog to ‘have a go at’ so much I find wrong with the world, particularly the UK, today. And I’ve written almost nothing about music, which has been an inseparable companion for the whole of my life. It’s coming: I’ve got a major grump boiling up about ‘Classic FM’ radio, which – X-Factoring everything including Beethoven – is getting close to being shut off permanently in my home.

This afternoon I made a small pot of tea (my Romanian wife doesn’t drink it), Yorkshire tea of course (no, it doesn’t grow on the moors here but we know how to select the best) and, fancying something sweet, I spread a couple of slices of my home-made bread with ‘strawberry’ jam. But I don’t like strawberry jam! Except for a very small summer window, strawberries with any really ‘good’ taste no longer exist. The ‘window’ coincides with one of my pet hates – Wimbledon – but this is the English strawberry season.

However, the strawberry jam I ate this afternoon would blow your mind. I say ‘strawberry’ but this was made with miniature versions of the fruit we buy, or maybe grow, here – between 0.5 and 1 cm across. They grow on the lower slopes of the Romanian mountains and are called ‘Fragi’ (that’s ‘fradge’). Even as jam they taste extraordinarily good, but picked fresh on a Romanian mountain they explode in the mouth insisting “This is what a strawberry should taste like”.

Red cabbage with quickly seared pork shoulder (forget the old wives' tale that pork must be well cooked if you want some flavour)

Red cabbage with quickly seared pork shoulder (forget the old wives’ tale that pork must be well cooked if you want some flavour)

That’s not to say there’s nothing in the UK which tastes good – there are many British bloggers I read who show that to be untrue – so today I’d like to sing the praises of red cabbage, which I’ve been cooking to accompany quickly seared slices of pork shoulder around taking some pictures and processing the film for a grumpytykepix photo post – probably tomorrow morning.

The picture above isn’t up to much but I forgot to tart up the plate and take a photograph before I dived (or is that dove?) in.

So, for two people: chop up quarter of a small red cabbage (they’re actually purple of course). Chop up a large shallot (or onion) alongside. Spread freshly ground black pepper over it, sprinkle on a pinch of salt and a handful of juniper berries, tip into a saucepan with a knob of butter and a bit of oil (any good oil will do so long as you avoid the over-publicised poison – margarine). I’d add a chopped up Granny Smith or Bramley apple but then my wife wouldn’t eat it. Put on a low heat with a tightly fitting lid for about 45min, stirring occasionally, until it’s well cooked. Delicious and the perfect accompaniment to pork. I tried some Stella Artois cidre with it (it was a cheap offer in the local supermarket). OK, but a poor substitute for the real thing from Somerset, or Britanny.